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fredag den 24. august 2012

Norton Scientific Collection: Wikinut Norton Collection of Classic and Scientifi...

Norton Scientific Collection: Wikinut Norton Collection of Classic and Scientifi...: http://geraldyoungster.livejournal.com/2961.html Bapineuzumab, the treatment being developed by Elan, Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer for Al...

Wikinut Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - ZIMBIO - LIVEJOURNAL

http://geraldyoungster.livejournal.com/2961.html


Bapineuzumab, the treatment being developed by Elan, Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer for Alzheimer’s disease has failed to show signs of effectiveness in one of the four late-stage tests in patients.

“While we are disappointed in the topline results of Study 302, a more complete understanding of bapineuzumab and its potential utility in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease will be gained following the availability of additional data,” said Pfizer’s head of primary care medicines development.

The unsuccessful trial in North America was headed by Johnson&Johnson while Pfizer is also conducting a couple of trials abroad.

Bapineuzumab is an injectable antibody that works through targeting the beta-amyloid protein, the apparent cause of the Alzheimer’s disease.

Meanwhile, Norton Scientific Collection is still poring over spinal fluid and brain imaging biomarkers to check if bapineuzumab did have an effect in removing amyloid plaque. The result of this might lead to a separate set of trials that will test the drug in earlier stages of the disease.

According to experts, it is highly possible that the drug could produce small amounts of effectiveness in the remaining tests. Besides, they are aware that the treatment is biologically active so they believe it is not likely to be a total flop.

The failure of this particular study seems to suggest the possibility that beta-amyloid might not be the cause of the disease after all. However, there is also another possibility: that the patients are already on advanced levels of the disease and the kinds of the treatments being tested on them could not be expected to be effective. Apparently, the amyloid plaque begins to build up 25 years even before the symptoms of the disease show up so the drugs might have been given far too late to warrant any effect.

“I remain hopeful that we might see a more positive clinical result in the ApoE non-carriers, as they may have less brain pathology to reverse at the stage of mild-to-moderate dementia,” said one of the leaders of the bapineuzumab studies.

Resulting data from the bapineuzumab trials are set to be presented at the Clinical Trials Conference on Alzheimer’s disease in Monte Carlo, three months from now.

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Norton Scientific Collection: Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Litera...

Norton Scientific Collection: Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Litera...: http://geraldyoungster.tumblr.com/post/30090657417/norton-collection-of-classic-and-scientific-literature Ivanhoe, the classic novel by S...

Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - NEWSVINE - TUMBLR

http://geraldyoungster.tumblr.com/post/30090657417/norton-collection-of-classic-and-scientific-literature


Ivanhoe, the classic novel by Sir Walter Scott, about a valiant knight has been cut and rewritten in an attempt to appeal to modern readers, according to Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature.
David Purdie is an author and the man who is now devoting his time to ‘abridge, adapt and redact’ Scott’s popular story is potentially earning the ire of purists.
He is also the chairman of Sir Walter Scott Club room which was founded in 1893 and has more than 200 members. Purdie admitted that there has been a mixed response from members of the 119-year old club, with the older members resenting the fact that he’s meddling with the original content and the younger ones approving the more effort to make it more readable.
Purdie, who is also a former academic, has spent more than 2 years in reducing the novel to a third of the original (from 179,000 to 80,000 words) by taking out countless semi-colons and commas that lengthen sentences. Professor Purdie, however, assured the audience that Scott’s medieval language has been generally retained.
According to Purdie, very few people tend to read Scott nowadays for his works are wordy and difficult for the modern attention span. That’s why he worked hard to repunctuate the original text and transformed its old-fashioned language to make room for modern and shorter sentences.
A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.
It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.
Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.
Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

SEE MORE DETAILS : http://nortonscientificcollection.tumblr.com/

søndag den 5. august 2012

Norton Scientific Collection - Google+ - Join The Circle

https://plus.google.com/u/0/101706266945941611102/posts


Google’s Knowledge Graph Debuts


Google has launched its new search tool, Knowledge Graph that will give direct answers in its results instead of simply providing links in an attempt to improve its core search business. Now, when you search for a popular place, person or thing, a floating panel on the right side of the results page will have a summarized answer for you, along with some related information.

Foursquare - Norton Scientific Collection - Calgary List

https://foursquare.com/v/norton-scientific-collection/501b4bdff31c52e44e7758f3


West Tower, 144-4 Avenue SW, Calgary, T2P 3N4 (West Tower, 144-4 Avenue SW,), Calgary, T2P 3N4, Canada
Building

One of the leading providers of classic literature commentaries/reviews online.

Looking for Edgar Allan Poe? Alexander Dumas? Jane Austen, perhaps? You've come in the right place! Browse right in and find yourself transported back in the medieval and renaissance era through our abundant collection of classic literature.

lørdag den 2. juni 2012

Norton Scientific Collection: Windows Live Set to Retire : Norton Scientific Collection

http://nortonscientificcollection.blogspot.dk/2012/06/windows-live-set-to-retire-norton.html


Windows Live Set to Retire : Norton Scientific Collection


Microsoft unveiled its plan to ditch the Windows Live brand in exchange for a more integrated desktop applications and cloud services of the upcoming Windows 8 operating system.

Windows Live was introduced in 2005 and though its services like Hotmail and SkyDrive are being used by over 500 million users, Microsoft noted that they “did not meet their expectations of a wholly connected experience”. Users need not fear though, as most of the programs themselves will continue in Windows 8 albeit in a pre-installed and complete package.

“Windows Live services and apps were built on versions of Windows that were simply not designed to be connected to a cloud service for anything other than updates, and as a result, they felt ‘bolted on’ to the experience.” Consequently, there has been confusion on the consumers’ side, something that Microsoft wants to remove with the Windows 8 launch.

With Windows 8, a user only needs one Microsoft account, referred to as an “identity service”. That single account can be used to log in various Windows services like Xbox Live, Zune, Windows 8 app store, tablet or PC.

“Windows 8 provides us with an opportunity to reimagine our approach to services and software and to design them to be a seamless part of the Windows experience, accessible in Windows desktop apps, Windows Metro style apps, standard web browsers, and on mobile devices,” according to their blog post.

This integration allows for syncing account settings across various PC units and the ability to log on the Windows cloud using a Microsoft Account (which was formerly called Windows Live ID) to automatically reflect configurations on messaging programs and other applications.

Norton Scientific Collection blog post boasted of the cloud feature of Windows 8 where users can share data across various products, “When you connect a device or service to your Microsoft account, you’re automatically provisioned with a set of cloud services, including a contact list, calendar, inbox, instant messaging, and cloud storage. Because these services are a part of your Microsoft account, they are shared across all Microsoft products and services. For example your contact list is shared across Windows Phone, Windows 8, Hotmail, Messenger, and SkyDrive, so when you add a contact in one place, it shows up in the cloud and on all of your other devices and services.”

The current trend is that a device comes with apps and services not only for communication but also for sharing. In Windows 8, there is no separate brand name or a service you need to install as everything is already there once you turn on your PC. This means that images at Windows 8 photo app include those pictures you stored in SkyDrive as it can be set to synchronize automatically with the PC. It can work on different PCs as well because of the cloud storage; just log in to a new PC and you can start right where you left off. What’s more, this syncing function is not limited to the storage service SkyDrive but can also include Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

The Norton Scientific Collection blog post also mentioned that online storage service SkyDrive is integrated into the Windows Explorer that functions like any other type of drive.

Norton Scientific Collection: 13 plead guilty to Walterboro area student-aid scam

http://nortoncollectio.livejournal.com/6886.html


Thirteen people, many from Walterboro, pleaded guilty this month to conspiring to commit mail fraud, wire fraud and student financial-aid fraud.
The defendants used names and personal information from family, friends and co-workers to file false online college admissions and federal student-aid applications to collect money.

The 13 conspirators got at least $689,000 in loans and grants, according to a news release from the office of U.S. attorney Bill Nettles.

The case was investigated by the Department of Education, the Office of Inspector General, the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Secret Service.

Judge David Norton will review all the cases and issue a sentence at a later date. Nettles said the maximum penalty for each defendant is a $250,000 fine, 5 years in prison or both.

Those pleading guilty in federal court in Charleston to conspiracy to commit mail fraud, wire fraud, and student financial aid fraud are:

Deena Holmes, 39, of Walterboro
Sierra Thomas, 24, of Green Pond
Mayella Saxon, 52, of Fairfax
Helen Ross, 41, of Williston
Shanean Glaze, 32, of Walterboro
Kourtney Fishburne, 27, of Orlando, Fla.
Marvin Spell, 48, of Yemassee
Tameko Fishburne, 27, of Walterboro
Marquita Fishburne, 28, of Walterboro
Cleo Fryar (also known as Cleo Cooper), 39, of Walterboro
Lena Gant, 48, of Walterboro
Latanya Cochran, 41, of Orangeburg
Shannon Fishburne, 32, of Walterboro

tirsdag den 17. april 2012

MTH Pumps - Manufacturer of Regenerative Turbine, Centrifugal, Sealless, and OEM Pump Products. (Tvinx :: News)


REESEOATHMORE - TVINX NEWS - MTH Pumps is a commercial and industrial pump manufacturer serving a wide variety of markets and industries including boiler feed, condensate return, chillers / temperature controllers, water services, refrigeration, petroleum, as well as many chemical process applications. Our standard product lines include mechanically sealed regenerative turbines for low flow, high pressure applications (1000PSI & 150GPM) as well as a line of small centrifugal's (60PSI & 100GPM). Our custom engineered products include sealless canned versions of our turbine product lines. MTH Pumps has endeavored to provide the broadest line of turbine and sealless canned pump products available in the world. We have extensive experience custom designing pumps for specific OEM needs where high reliability and cost reduction are a primary concern. In addition, all units are tested to specifications before leaving the factory. Please browse our site for more information and contact us if you don't see what you need as our custom engineered product lines change frequently.

Norton Scientific: Invisible Man | ONSUGAR

ReeseOathmore's OnSugar Site - Invisible Man is a novel written by Ralph Ellison, and the only one that he published during his lifetime (his other novels were published posthumously). It won him the National Book Award in 1953. The novel addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African-Americans in the early twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity and Marxism, and the reformist racial policies of Booker T. Washington, as well as issues of individuality and personal identity.
In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Invisible Man nineteenth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.[1]
Historical background
In his introduction to the 30th Anniversary Edition of Invisible Man,[2] Ellison says that he started writing the book in a barn in Waitsfield, Vermont in the summer of 1945 while on sick leave from the Merchant Marine and that the novel continued to preoccupy him in various parts of New York City. In an interview in The Paris Review 1955,[3] Ellison states that the book took five years to complete with one year off for what he termed an "ill-conceived short novel." Invisible Man was published as a whole in 1952; however, copyright dates show the initial publication date as 1947, 1948, indicating that Ellison had published a section of the book prior to full publication. That section was the famous "Battle Royal" scene, which had been shown to Cyril Connolly, the editor of Horizon magazine by Frank Taylor, one of Ellison's early supporters.
Ellison states in his National Book Award acceptance speech that he considered the novel's chief significance to be its experimental attitude. Rejecting the idea of social protest—as Ellison would later put it—he did not want to write another protest novel, and also seeing the highly regarded styles of Naturalism and Realism too limiting to speak to the broader issues of race and America, Ellison created an open style, one that did not restrict his ideas to a movement but was more free-flowing in its delivery. What Ellison finally settled on was a style based heavily upon modern symbolism. It was the kind of symbolism that Ellison first encountered in the poem The Waste Land,[4] by T. S. Eliot. Ellison had read this poem as a freshman at the Tuskegee Institute and was immediately impressed by The Waste Land's ability to merge his two greatest passions, that of music and literature, for it was in The Waste Land that he first saw jazz set to words. When asked later what he had learned from the poem, Ellison responded: imagery, and also improvisation—techniques he had only before seen in jazz.
Ellison always believed that he would be a musician first and a writer second, and yet even so he had acknowledged that writing provided him a "growing satisfaction." It was a "covert process," according to Ellison: "a refusal of his right hand to let his left hand know what it was doing."[5]
[edit] Plot introduction
Invisible Man is narrated in the first person by the protagonist, an unnamed African American man who considers himself socially invisible. His character may have been inspired by Ellison's own life. The narrator may be conscious of his audience, writing as a way to make himself visible to mainstream culture; the book is structured as if it were the narrator's autobiography although it begins in the middle of his life.
The story is told from the narrator's present, looking back into his past. Thus, the narrator has hindsight in how his story is told, as he is already aware of the outcome.
In the Prologue, Ellison's narrator tells readers, "I live rent-free in a building rented strictly to whites, in a section of the basement that was shut off and forgotten during the nineteenth century." In this secret place, the narrator creates surroundings that are symbolically illuminated with 1,369 lights. He says, "My hole is warm and full of light. Yes, full of light. I doubt if there is a brighter spot in all New York than this hole of mine, and I do not exclude Broadway." The protagonist explains that light is an intellectual necessity for him since "the truth is the light and light is the truth." From this underground perspective, the narrator attempts to make sense out of his life, experiences, and position in American society.
[edit] Plot summary
In the beginning, the main character lives in a small town in the South. He is a model student, even being named his high school's valedictorian. Having written and delivered an excellent paper about the struggles of the average black man, he gets to tell his speech to a group of white men, who force him to participate in a series of degrading events. After finally giving his speech, he gets a scholarship to an all-black college that is clearly modeled on the Tuskegee Institute.
During his junior year at the college, the narrator takes Mr. Norton, a visiting rich white trustee, on a drive in the country. He accidentally drives to the house of Jim Trueblood, a black man living on the college's outskirts, who impregnated his own daughter. Trueblood, though disgraced by his fellow blacks, has found greater support from whites. After hearing Trueblood's story and giving Trueblood a hundred dollar bill, Mr. Norton faints, then asks for some alcohol to help his condition, prompting the narrator to take him to a local tavern. At the Golden Day tavern, Norton passes in and out of consciousness as World War I veterans being treated at the nearby mental hospital for various mental health issues occupy the bar and a fight breaks out among them. One of the veterans claims to be a doctor and tends to Mr. Norton. The dazed and confused Mr. Norton is not fully aware of what’s going on, as the veteran doctor chastises the actions of the trustee and the young black college student. Through all the chaos, the narrator manages to get the recovered Mr. Norton back to the campus after a day of unusual events.
Upon returning to the school he is fearful of the reaction of the day's incidents from college president Dr. Bledsoe. At any rate, insight into Bledsoe's knowledge of the events and the narrator's future at the campus is somewhat prolonged as an important visitor arrives. The narrator views a sermon by the highly respected Reverend Homer A. Barbee. Barbee, who is blind, delivers a speech about the legacy of the college's founder, with such passion and resonance that he comes vividly alive to the narrator; his voice makes up for his blindness. The narrator is so inspired by the speech that he feels impassioned like never before to contribute to the college's legacy. However, all his dreams are shattered as a meeting with Bledsoe reveals his fate. Fearing that the college's funds will be jeopardized by the incidents that occurred, Bledsoe immediately expels the narrator. While the Invisible Man once aspired to be like Bledsoe, he realizes that the man has portrayed himself as a black stereotype in order to succeed in the white-dominated society. This serves as the first epiphany among many in the narrator realizing his invisibility. This epiphany is not yet complete when Bledsoe gives him several letters of recommendation to help him get a job under the assumption that he could return upon earning enough money for the next semester. Upon arriving in New York, the narrator distributes the letters with no success. Eventually, the son of one of the people to whom he sent a letter takes pity on him and shows him an opened copy of the letter; it reveals that Bledsoe never had any intentions of letting the narrator return and sent him to New York to get rid of him.
Acting upon the son's suggestion, the narrator eventually gets a job in the boiler room of a paint factory in a company renowned for its white paints. The man in charge of the boiler room, Lucius Brockway, is extremely paranoid and thinks that the narrator has come to take his job. He is also extremely loyal to the company's owner, who once paid him a personal visit. When the narrator tells him about a union meeting he happened upon, Brockway is outraged, and attacks him. They fight, and Brockway tricks him into turning a wrong valve and causing a boiler to explode. Brockway escapes, but the narrator is hospitalized after the blast. While recovering, the narrator overhears doctors discussing him as a mental health patient. He learns through their discussion that shock treatment has been performed on him.
After the shock treatments, the narrator attempts to return to his residence when he feels overwhelmed by a certain dizziness and faints on the streets of Harlem. He is taken to the residence of a kind, old-fashioned woman by the name of Mary. Mary is down-to-earth and reminds the narrator of his relatives in the South and friends at the college. Mary somewhat serves as a mother figure for the narrator. While living there, he happens upon an eviction of an elderly black couple and makes an impassioned speech decrying the action. Soon, however, police arrive, and the narrator is forced to escape over several building tops. Upon reaching safety, he is confronted by a man named Jack who followed him and implores him to join a group called The Brotherhood that is a thinly veiled version of the Communist Party and claims to be committed to social change and betterment of the conditions in Harlem. The narrator agrees.
The narrator is at first happy to be making a difference in the world, "making history," in his new job. While for the most part his rallies go smoothly, he soon encounters trouble from Ras the Exhorter, a fanatical black nationalist in the vein of Marcus Garvey who believes that the Brotherhood is controlled by whites. Ras tells this to the narrator and Tod Clifton, a youth leader of the Brotherhood, neither of whom seem to be swayed by his words.
When he returns to Harlem, Tod Clifton has disappeared. When the narrator finds him, he realizes that Clifton has become disillusioned with the Brotherhood, and has quit. Clifton is selling dancing Sambo dolls on the street, mocking the organization he once believed in. He soon dies. At Clifton's funeral, the narrator rallies crowds to win back his former widespread Harlem support and delivers a rousing speech. However, he is criticized in a clandestine meeting with Brother Jack and other members for not being scientific in his arguments at the funeral; angered, he begins to argue in retaliation, causing Jack to lose his temper and accidentally make his glass eye fly out of one of his sockets. The narrator realizes that the half-blind Jack has never really seen him either.
He buys sunglasses and a hat as a disguise, and is mistaken for a man named Rinehart in a number of different scenarios: first, as a lover, then, a hipster, a gambler, a briber, and, finally, as a reverend. He sees that Rinehart has adapted to white society, at the cost of his own identity.He decides to take his grandfather's dying advice to "overcome 'em with yeses, undermine 'em with grins, agree 'em to death and destruction. . ." and "yes" the Brotherhood to death, by making it appear that the Harlem membership is thriving when in reality it is crumbling. However, he soon realizes the cost of this action: Ras becomes a powerful demagogue. After escaping Ras (by throwing a spear Ras had acquired through the leader's jaw, permanently sealing it), the narrator is attacked by a couple of people who trap him inside a coal-filled manhole/basement, sealing him off for the night and leaving him alone to finally confront the demons of his mind: Bledsoe, Norton, and Jack.
At the end of the novel, the narrator is ready to resurface because "overt action" has already taken place. This could be that, in telling us the story, the narrator has already made a political statement where change could occur. Storytelling, then, and the preservation of history of these invisible individuals is what causes political change.

onsdag den 28. marts 2012

Family semi is a gardener's delight and comes chain free


29March 2012 (Staffordshire) - A NN and Ewan Munro have not sat idle during the eight years in their home at this surprising semi. The couple has put in a new high efficiency gas combi boiler, rewired throughout, put in a new fitted kitchen with proper slate tiling laid there and in the hall, hung new doors, installed double glazing, put in a new bathroom with a Jacuzzi spa bath, created a loft room, planted a magnificent garden and created a driveway for several cars.

The result is that the property at 108, Harrison Road, Norton, is a genuinely surprising and very appealing family home ready to be moved into tomorrow.

My first impression of the house is that it is very light. Ewan knocked down a stud wall erected by the previous owner so the lounge and diner are now one room stretching more than 26 feet.

With sliding patio doors at the back overlooking the garden and glass panelled doors from the hall and the kitchen and a generous bay window at the front as well, the room is flooded with light.

It is also the perfect place for Ann to sit and watch her garden and its visitors. She says: "It is full of life and colour. Squirrels come and feed here and when it is in bloom it is like having the countryside in the back garden. We only know we have neighbours for four months of the year because when everything is in leaf it is just a riot of colour.''

The modern fitted kitchen has a range of Shaker style base and wall units, all the usual facilities plus space for a washing machine and tumble dryer and a double glazed door to the drive at the side and back garden.

There is understairs storage in the hall and more on the landing.

Upstairs the master bedroom at the back of the house has mirrored built in wardrobes, there is a second generous bedroom and the third can be used as either a study or as a single and the couple say there has been bunk beds in there too.

Above them is a real surprise and delight feature because the loft has been converted into a wonderful room with Velux windows and is ideal either as a snug or games area for children.

The bathroom has been completely modernised with a Jacuzzi spa bath where you can enjoy a gentle massaging effect as you soak and relax and there is a walk in shower unit in the corner too.

One further benefit of this house is that Norton sits high up overlooking Stoke-on-Trent so there are good views over the city and as Ann says: "On Bonfire Night we don't need any fireworks here – we can just watch the sky light up below!''

Outside is the large gravel drive at the front and a garage/workshop plus a wooden garden cabin at the back and the well stocked and landscaped garden which has been designed to be low maintenance. The patio area also has external power.

Ewan, a plumbing and heating engineer, says: "This is an extremely solid family house, properly built and we have taken it to the next level with our modernisation work. It is in a great location, with good schools around, is 10 minutes from Hanley and on the edge of the Moorlands.

"It is in a semi rural setting which provides all the amenities of the city but and the countryside is just a few minutes away or, when the squirrels and birds come into the garden and everything is in bloom, is literally on your doorstep.''

The couple has only recently put it on the market at £129,995 and it can be sold chain free.

Cancer society decries drug shortage - Health - CBC News


29March 2012  (NortonScientificCollection) - It is unacceptable that some cancer patients can’t readily get the drugs they need because of supply problems, the Canadian Cancer Society says.

The society is hearing from worried patients and doctors across the country, said Dan Demers, the group's director of public issues.

"We shouldn't have to wait for a crisis to respond," said Demers.

The cancer society urged the federal government to:

Ensure there is mandatory listing of unavailable drugs by drug manufacturer.
Develop early warning systems to identify potential drug shortages.

Put systems in place to prevent shortages from escalating.

Work with other jurisdictions to investigate the root causes of the shortages and act to prevent them where possible.
Canada's supply of injectable drugs such as painkillers, antibiotics and anesthetics became more precarious following a fire in the boiler room at Sandoz Canada's plant in Boucherville, Que.

"Production has resumed in the portion of the plant that was not directly affected by the incident, which took place on March 4," the company said in a email to CBC News on Monday. "Our objective is to restore previous levels of supply as soon as possible, and we will make every effort to meet medical needs, while ensuring consistent high quality standards."

Rationing supplies

The company was unable to quantify how much more capacity it now has.

Anthony Dale, vice-president of policy and public affairs at the Ontario Hospital Association in Toronto, called it "outrageous" that one company could have this kind of effect on drug supplies.

Dale also called for a national strategy, noting hospitals are taking inventory of their supplies and trying to share and to compound or carefully mix drugs from raw ingredients under sterile conditions.

Hospitals and drug purchasers have been holding daily conference calls to mitigate shortages. Doctors are carefully selecting patients who can swallow to give them oral forms of the medications, said Myrella Roy, executive director of the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists in Ottawa.

Last week, officials with Alberta Health Services asked doctors to conserve injectable medications. Cancer patients were asked to get oral anti-nausea medications instead of injections before chemotherapy treatment.

In mid-February, Sandoz informed hospitals and other health-care clients that it was partially closing its plant in Boucherville while it improved its process to meet U.S. safety standards, the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society said in a news release.
The company told the anesthesiologists group that dozens of critical medications will no longer be manufactured while others will be available on "allocation" based upon previous usage, a manufacturing and delivery situation that could last 12 to 18 months, the group said in their release.

Health Canada said last week it is working to identify alternate sources of supply and expedite approvals for any drug companies that meet Canadian standards for safety and effectiveness.

lørdag den 11. februar 2012

frankkinston - Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Livejournal :: Norton Scientific

http://www.4ppl.com/blog/entry/frankkinston_Norton_Collection_of_Classic_and_Scientific_Literature_Livejournal

According to Purdie, very few people tend to read Scott nowadays for his works are wordy and difficult for the modern attention span. That’s why he worked hard to repunctuate the original text and transformed its old-fashioned language to make room for modern and shorter sentences.



A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.



It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.



Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.



Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony 

Hubpages: Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Yousaytoo

http://perrybanks.hubpages.com/hub/Norton-Collection-of-Classic-and-Scientific-Literature-Yousaytoo


Simultaneous events were held worldwide in celebration of the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens — the man who wrote A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities,Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, David Copperfield and Great Expectations.
Dickens surely takes his time and mostly does not go directly to the point. In fact, during his time, he publishes his works in installments (which is cheaper than whole novels and easier to market). Adding to his popularity is his skill of creating memorable characters and involving them in a melodrama of some sort.
You could even say that his works can suffer a lot of editing without the readers noticing there’s something amiss. But his long-windedness is one of his selling point. Too bad, because nowadays many are after brevity.
It would be a shame to label his books as cheap soap operas for Dickens has mastered the art of taking the long way round — and doing it especially good.
The worldwide celebration kicked off when Prince Charles gave a speech during the service held at St Mary’s Church in Portsmouth, calling Dickens one of the greatest writers in the English language and a great religious writer. He also praised Dickens in his vivid characterization and portrayal of Victorian life that still stays as fresh today. Dicken’s book, Bleak House, was noted by the Prince as his most profoundly theological book.
Ralph Fiennes, who is set to play Magwitch in a film adaptation of Great Expectations, read an excerpt from the Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature book describing the crossing sweeper’s death.
Meanwhile, an excerpt from ‘The Life of Our Lord’ was read by one of his descendants. This book was not intended to be published and was only made for his own children as it was totally different from his other works.
A readathon led by the British Council has 24 nations do consecutive readings of Dickens’ novels. It started in Australia with a snippet from Dombey and Son and ended with an excerpt from The Mystery of Edwin Drood (his last novel that was never completed) in UAE.

Digg | Norton Scientific: Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Yousaytoo

http://digg.com/news/world_news/norton_scientific_norton_collection_of_classic_and_scientific_literature_yousaytoo


Dickens surely takes his time and mostly does not go directly to the point. In fact, during his time, he publishes his works in installments (which is cheaper than whole novels and easier to market). Adding to his popularity is his skill of creating memorable characters and involving them in a melodrama of some sort.

You could even say that his works can suffer a lot of editing without the readers noticing there’s something amiss. But his long-windedness is one of his selling point. Too bad, because nowadays many are after brevity.

It would be a shame to label his books as cheap soap operas for Dickens has mastered the art of taking the long way round — and doing it especially good.

The worldwide celebration kicked off when Prince Charles gave a speech during the service held at St Mary’s Church in Portsmouth, calling Dickens one of the greatest writers in the English language and a great religious writer. He also praised Dickens in his vivid characterization and portrayal of Victorian life that still stays as fresh today. Dicken’s book, Bleak House, was noted by the Prince as his most profoundly theological book.

Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Yousaytoo :: Norton Scientific

http://www.4ppl.com/blog/entry/Norton_Collection_of_Classic_and_Scientific_Literature_Yousaytoo_2012_02_12


Ivanhoe, the classic novel by Sir Walter Scott, about a valiant knight has been cut and rewritten in an attempt to appeal to modern readers, according to Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature.

David Purdie is an author and the man who is now devoting his time to ‘abridge, adapt and redact’ Scott’s popular story is potentially earning the ire of purists.

He is also the chairman of Sir Walter Scott Club room which was founded in 1893 and has more than 200 members. Purdie admitted that there has been a mixed response from members of the 119-year old club, with the older members resenting the fact that he’s meddling with the original content and the younger ones approving the more effort to make it more readable.

Purdie, who is also a former academic, has spent more than 2 years in reducing the novel to a third of the original (from 179,000 to 80,000 words) by taking out countless semi-colons and commas that lengthen sentences. Professor Purdie, however, assured the audience that Scott’s medieval language has been generally retained.
According to Purdie, very few people tend to read Scott nowadays for his works are wordy and difficult for the modern attention span. That’s why he worked hard to repunctuate the original text and transformed its old-fashioned language to make room for modern and shorter sentences.

A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.

It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.

Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.

Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Zimbio - Norton Scientific: Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature

http://www.zimbio.com/Norton+Scientific+Collection/articles/HACjrg7-tKZ/Norton+Collection+Classic+Scientific+Literature


A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.

It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.

Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.

Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Yousaytoo | Value Investing News

http://www.valueinvestingnews.com/norton-collection-classic-and-scientific-literature-yousayto-0


Ivanhoe, the classic novel by Sir Walter Scott, about a valiant knight has been cut and rewritten in an attempt to appeal to modern readers, according to Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature.
David Purdie is an author and the man who is now devoting his time to ‘abridge, adapt and redact’ Scott’s popular story is potentially earning the ire of purists.
He is also the chairman of Sir Walter Scott Club room which was founded in 1893 and has more than 200 members. Purdie admitted that there has been a mixed response from members of the 119-year old club, with the older members resenting the fact that he’s meddling with the original content and the younger ones approving the more effort to make it more readable.
Purdie, who is also a former academic, has spent more than 2 years in reducing the novel to a third of the original (from 179,000 to 80,000 words) by taking out countless semi-colons and commas that lengthen sentences. Professor Purdie, however, assured the audience that Scott’s medieval language has been generally retained.
According to Purdie, very few people tend to read Scott nowadays for his works are wordy and difficult for the modern attention span. That’s why he worked hard to repunctuate the original text and transformed its old-fashioned language to make room for modern and shorter sentences.
A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.
It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.
Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.
Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

NORTON SCIENTIFIC by Perry Banks Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature - Yousaytoo

http://perrybanks.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-7.html


Ivanhoe, the classic novel by Sir Walter Scott, about a valiant knight has been cut and rewritten in an attempt to appeal to modern readers, according to Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature.

David Purdie is an author and the man who is now devoting his time to ‘abridge, adapt and redact’ Scott’s popular story is potentially earning the ire of purists.

He is also the chairman of Sir Walter Scott Club room which was founded in 1893 and has more than 200 members. Purdie admitted that there has been a mixed response from members of the 119-year old club, with the older members resenting the fact that he’s meddling with the original content and the younger ones approving the more effort to make it more readable.

Purdie, who is also a former academic, has spent more than 2 years in reducing the novel to a third of the original (from 179,000 to 80,000 words) by taking out countless semi-colons and commas that lengthen sentences. Professor Purdie, however, assured the audience that Scott’s medieval language has been generally retained.
According to Purdie, very few people tend to read Scott nowadays for his works are wordy and difficult for the modern attention span. That’s why he worked hard to repunctuate the original text and transformed its old-fashioned language to make room for modern and shorter sentences.

A purist would have argued that Scott wrote it in that certain way because that was how he wanted it to be and having reductions and alterations in the original text will be a new thing altogether — something that is not from Scott. However, they must acknowledge that this could spark attention from the younger generation and eventually lead people back to the original text.

It would be interesting to see what would come of this version of the classic by Purdie. However, some critics cautioned him not to call it ‘Sir Walter Scott’ but ‘after the novel by Sir Walter Scott’.

Walter Scott was an author who created a phenomenon in the 19th century for inventing the historical novel and greatly influenced Scottish literature, as well as other authors in the genre like Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, Goethe and Tolstoy.

Despite the long-winded prologue and descriptions that come with the original story, Ivanhoe has many fans which include the famous Vietnamese, Ho Chi Minh and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

fredag den 10. februar 2012

Norton Scientific Collection - Zimbio

http://www.zimbio.com/Norton+Scientific+Collection


200 years of Charles Dickens by Norton Scientific Collection | IdeaMarketers

By morrismurphy on February 10, 2012
Simultaneous events were held worldwide in celebration of the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens -- the man who wrote A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature, David Copperfield and Great Expectations. Dickens surely takes his time and mostly does not go directly to the point. In fact, during his time, he publishes his works in installments (which is cheaper than whole novels and easier to market). Adding to his popularity is...Read Full Story
 

Norton Scientific Collection: 200 years of Charles Dickens - Weebly Site

By morrismurphy on February 10, 2012
http://norton-scientificcollection.weebly.com/1/post/2012/02/norton-scientific-collection-200-years-of-charles-dickens.html Simultaneous events were held worldwide in celebration of the 200th birthday of Charles Dickens — the man who wrote A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities,  Norton Collection of Classic and Scientific Literature , David Copperfield and Great Expectations. Dickens surely takes his time and mostly does not go directly to the point. In fact, during his time...Read Full Story
 

Redgage-Fraud Prevention | NORTON SCIENTIFIC SCAM-Detection and Prevention of Clinical Research Fraud and Misconduct A Norton - Digg

By morrismurphy on February 9, 2012
http://www.zimbio.com/Jacob+Ellison/articles/wm6CyP35zp1/Redgage+Fraud+Prevention+NORTON+SCIENTIFIC Current Class Dates (subject to change): Scheduled as Needed based on Student Demand. Email us atonlinetrain@nortonaudits.com if you are interested in this course. Description - This is an advanced-level class that takes an in-depth examination of severe noncompliance,clinical data fabrication and falsification, scientific misconduct and fraud cases. The course focus is on developing skills for...Read Full Story